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Monday, November 26
 

8:00am

Conversation with the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Join the members of the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights in an informal conversation about their mandate to promote implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and to chair the Forum.

Working Group members will give an overview of their ongoing work and explain the background for the theme of this year's Forum. The introduction will be followed by a Q&A and an opportunity for participants to make suggestions to the Working Group.

Links to Working Group main page and thematic pages
Interpretation is provided in Korean

Speakers
avatar for Surya Deva

Surya Deva

Chairperson, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Mr. Surya Deva is an Associate Professor at the School of Law of City University of Hong Kong. He holds BA (Hons), LLB and LLM from the University of Delhi and a PhD from Sydney Law School, and has taught previously at the University of Delhi and at the National Law Institute University... Read More →
avatar for Elżbieta Karska

Elżbieta Karska

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Ms. Elżbieta Karska is a Professor and the Head of the Department of Protection of Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law and the Director of the Institute of International Law, European Union and International Relations at the Faculty of Law and Administration, Cardinal... Read More →
avatar for Githu Muigai

Githu Muigai

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Mr. Githu Muigai is current Associate Professor of Law, Department of Public Law, University of Nairobi; Chairman at the Council of Legal Education in Kenya; and Senior Partner, Mohammed & Muigai Advocates. He previously served as a Commissioner with the former Constitution of Kenya... Read More →
avatar for Dante Pesce

Dante Pesce

Chairperson, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Mr. Dante Pesce holds a Masters in Political Science from the Catholic University of Chile and a Masters in Public Administration from Harvard University. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the VINCULAR Center for Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development at the... Read More →
avatar for Anita Ramasastry

Anita Ramasastry

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Ms. Anita Ramasastry is the Roland L. Hjorth Professor of Law and the Director of the Graduate Program in Sustainable International Development at the University of Washington School Of Law. She researches and teaches in the fields of law and development, anti-corruption, international... Read More →


Monday November 26, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Room XXI

9:00am

Corporate human rights due diligence – state of play and way forward
Organized by the Working Group on business and human rights

Brief description of the session:
This session will feature a presentation by the Chairperson of the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights, Dante Pesce. The presentation will highlight key findings and recommendations from the Working Group's report to the UN General Assembly in October 2018.
The focus of the report is the concept of corporate human rights due diligence set out in the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. The presentation will highlight key features of human rights due diligence and why it matters; gaps and challenges in current business and Government practice; emerging good practices; and how key stakeholders — States and the investment community, in particular — can contribute to the scaling-up of effective human rights due diligence.

Key documents

Interpretation is provided in Korean

Speakers
avatar for Dante Pesce

Dante Pesce

Chairperson, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Mr. Dante Pesce holds a Masters in Political Science from the Catholic University of Chile and a Masters in Public Administration from Harvard University. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the VINCULAR Center for Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development at the... Read More →



Monday November 26, 2018 9:00am - 10:00am
Room XXIII

9:00am

Voices from the ground
http://webtv.un.org/search/panel-on-voices-from-the-ground-forum-on-business-and-human-rights-2018/5971600547001/?term=&lan=english&cat=Forum%20on%20Business%20and%20Human%20Rights&sort=date&page=2

Convened by the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights in collaboration with: Business & Human Rights Resource Centre (BHRRC), International Service for Human Rights (ISHR), International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR), Eliminating Child Labour in Tobacco-growing (ECLT), The African Coalition for Corporate Accountability (ACCA), Dhaatri Resource Centre for Women and Children's Rights, Global Witness and Rafto Foundation for Human Rights

Short description of the session:
This trailblazing session will feature a panel made up of only human rights defenders and community representatives from all regions, who will speak frankly about their stories and experiences of working to improve business respect for human rights in their countries, as well as the attacks they are under because of doing so. The session will be divided into three parts: the first part with focus on ways in which they’ve successfully defended themselves and achieved their goals this year, the second part will identify the common challenges that defenders and community representatives face in their work, and the third part will outline what they want to see between now and the next forum. We will leave enough time for interaction with the audience after each segment.
This session will offer an insight into the lives and struggles of defenders and community representatives, and outline a set of their core challenges and expectations to businesses, investors and governments, thus setting the scene for the 7th Forum on Business and Human Rights.

Session objectives:
The session will provide a “reality-check” early on in the Forum, and outline a set of core challenges and expectations by defenders and community representatives to businesses and governments, thus setting the scene for the 7th Forum on Business and Human Rights. The goal of the first part will be discuss ways that they’ve successfully defended themselves and achieved their goals so far, the objective of the second part will be to identify common challenges that defenders face in their work, and the objective of the third part will be to for defenders and community representatives to voice their expectations to the forum (governments, businesses, and investors).

Key discussion questions:
  • 1st part: focuses on ways in which they’ve successfully defended themselves and achieved their goals so far
    Question(s) to speakers: What was your main achievement in your work as a defender or community representatives this year? Why do you do what you do and what keeps you going?  
    Sub-questions: What were the main things that helped you and your colleagues continue defending human rights in the context of business operations in your country over the past year (coalitions, partnerships, new approaches to work, financial support, new laws, support from community/ family/ friends, religion, etc.)
  • 2nd part: focuses on challenges HRDs face in their work
    Question(s) to speakers: Who prevents you from advocating for rights in your country and how? What are the main types of attack you and your colleagues have faced in defending human rights in business operations in your country this year?
  • 3rd part: focuses on what they would like to ask from the forum (govts, businesses, investors) - what do they want to see between now and the next forum
    Question(s) to be asked to speakers: What are the main things that you would like to see businesses, investors and governments do in the coming year, that would  improve the safety for and prevent attacks on defenders working for human rights in business in your country, and improve business respect for human rights? 

Format of the session:
The session will open with a question or two to the audience to get them engaged early on. It will then be divided into three parts: the first part will identify ways in which they’ve successfully defended themselves and achieved their goals so far, the second will identify challenges that defenders face in their work, and the third part will outline what they would like to ask from the forum (governments, businesses, and investors) and what do they want to see between now and the next forum. We will leave enough time for interaction with the audience after each segment, so that governments, investors and businesses, can voice their proposals and feedback, and so that defenders and community representatives that won’t get a chance to speak on the panel, will have the opportunity to also share their stories (time permitting). The role of the moderator will be to engage the audience and to summarize the challenges and the demands voiced by the defenders.
In terms of identifying and voicing expectations, the speakers and the moderator will, to the extent possible, surface and built upon existing demands, such as the Action plan from the World HRDs Summit, the joint statement from 40+ civil society organizations from 2016, the Special Rapporteur on Human Rights Defenders’ reports on the topic and other relevant material.

Background to the discussion:
Business and civil society operate in and benefit from a “shared space” defined by common, fundamental elements. The rule of law and freedom of expression, association and assembly are essential to the realization of all human rights, to good governance and accountable institutions. These elements are also critical to stable, profitable and sustainable business environments in which companies thrive and economies prosper. Standards and practices have evolved over the last two decades to encourage or require companies to respect human rights. Moreover, company engagement and consultation with local communities and stakeholders is overcoming conflict and confrontation in places and ways that encourage further progress. However, this shared space is under threat, not least through a sustained and growing attack on defenders wherever businesses have failed to comply with and respect due diligence national laws, standards and national and international human rights protocols. Alarmingly, in the last decade, HRDs have increasingly come under massive attack. Since 2015, there have been over 1,300 attacks on HRDs working human rights issues related to business, including almost 400 killings. Workers were exposed to physical violence and threats in 65 countries in 2018 and trade unionists were murdered in nine countries in the first half of that year. Journalists are increasingly being imprisoned and attacked – 262 journalists were imprisoned in 2017 and 29 journalists have been killed in 2018. Civicus data indicates that only 3% of people on the planet live in countries with truly ‘open civic space’. These pressures and attacks undermine the legal and institutional frameworks upon which both business and civil society depend. For the business and human rights agenda to continue moving forward, defenders, and the civic freedoms they need to do their work, must be recognized as a vital and inescapable part of ensuring human rights respect in business operations. Defenders cannot play that role without solid guarantees of safety and security. States have primary role in ensuring corporates respect constitutional frameworks and set in place governance machinery, regulatory mechanisms, legal and policy structures and resources as well as place the upholding of human rights and well-being of all its citizens at the core of its development economy.


Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Debbie Stothard

Debbie Stothard

Secretary-General / Coordinator, FIDH/ ALTSEAN-Burma
Debbie Stothard has worked since 1981 in media, academia, community education & human rights in Malaysia, Australia and Thailand. Her work in training grassroots communities and advocacy is focused on women's leadership, atrocity prevention, and business and human rights.

Speakers
SK

Saeeda Kathoum

spokes-person, Ali Enterprises Factory Fire Affectees Association
O

Olman

Olman represents his fellow students and his community in Western Guatemala. Though he has returned to his studies, Olman is a former child labourer who will share about the realities he and other young people like him face accessing education, working from a young age. As the first-ever... Read More →
avatar for Emmanuel Umpula

Emmanuel Umpula

Directeur, AFREWATCH
M. Umpula Nkumba Emmanuel, est directeur et fondateur de Afrewatch (AFREWATCH), il est juriste et travaille depuis 2002 à la défense et la promotion des droits de l'homme en RDC et en Afrique sur les entreprises et les droits de l'homme. Pendant son parcours, il a occupé plusieurs... Read More →


Monday November 26, 2018 9:00am - 10:30am
Room XX

11:00am

Opening plenary
http://webtv.un.org/search/opening-plenary-forum-on-business-and-human-rights-2018/5971612297001/?term=&lan=english&cat=Forum%20on%20Business%20and%20Human%20Rights&page=2

Interpretation is provided in English, French, Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, Russian and Korean.
Watch the video recording in 
UN WebTV

Programme:
The Forum’s opening will consist of three parts:
  • (11:00-11:15): Welcome by UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet and by the Chair of the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights Dante Pesce.
  • (11:15-12:05): Conversation with civil society leaders.
  • (12:10-13:00): Conversation with business leaders.

Overall aim of opening plenary
The opening plenary of the UN Forum provides leadership and high-level perspectives on the main theme of the Forum. It features leaders from different background who can inspire others and help set the tone for constructive and solution-oriented dialogue over the three Forum days.
The backdrop to the discussions is the Forum’s mandate focused on discussing trends, challenges and emerging good practices in translating the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights for implementing the UN “Protect, Respect and Remedy” Framework into practice, and promoting multi-stakeholder dialogue and cooperation on business and human rights.

Conversation with civil society leaders 
Prominent human rights advocates from around the world will share personal and inspiring stories of their struggles to call for business respect for human rights in practice.
Speakers:
  • Kailash Satyarthi, 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Kailash Satyarthi Children's Foundation
  • Angkhana Neelapaijit, Commissioner, National Human Rights Commission of Thailand
  • Leonardo Sakamoto, Member of the Board of Trustees, UN Voluntary Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery, journalist, member of the Brazilian National Commission for the Eradication of Slave Labour and Chairman of Repórter Brasil.
  • Phyllis Omido, founder of the Center for Justice Governance and Environmental Action (Kenya)
  • Moderator: Kate Gilmore, UN Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights

Conversation with business leaders 
Senior business leaders with share their perspectives on embedding respect for human rights in company practice and the importance of human rights due diligence.
Speakers:
  • Tania Cosentino, SDG Pioneer; Senior Vice President, Schneider Electric
  • Gary Goldberg, Chief Executive Officer, Newmont Mining Corporation
  • Patrick Pouyanné, Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer, TOTAL S.A.
  • Jeannette Von Wolfersdorff, Member of the Board of the Santiago Exchange
  • Moderator: Dante Pesce, Chairperson of the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights

Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Kate Gilmore

Kate Gilmore

United Nations Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
Kate Gilmore was appointed United Nations Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights on 1st December 2015.She brings to the position diverse and longstanding experience in strategic leadership and human rights advocacy with the United Nations, government and non-government organizations.Prior... Read More →
avatar for Dante Pesce

Dante Pesce

Chairperson, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Mr. Dante Pesce holds a Masters in Political Science from the Catholic University of Chile and a Masters in Public Administration from Harvard University. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the VINCULAR Center for Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development at the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Bachelet

Michelle Bachelet

United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
On September 1, 2018 Michelle Bachelet assumed her functions as the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights was established in 1993 and Ms. Bachelet is the seventh Commissioner.Ms. Bachelet was elected President of Chile... Read More →
avatar for Tania Cosentino

Tania Cosentino

Senior Vice President of Customer Satisfaction & Quality, Schneider Electric
Over the last 30 years, Tania Cosentino has dedicated her career to the electric industrial segment. She has occupied several managerial positions and functions in different companies, and this gave her a global and deep vision of the energy sector, its operations and trends.Tania... Read More →
avatar for Gary Goldberg

Gary Goldberg

Chief Executive Officer, Newmont Goldcorp
Gary J. Goldberg was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer and joined the Board of Directors of Newmont Mining Corporation on March 1, 2013. He previously served as President and Chief Operating Officer since July 2012 and as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating... Read More →
avatar for Angkhana  Neelapaijit

Angkhana Neelapaijit

Commissioner, National Human Rights Commission of Thailand (NHRCT)
Angkhana  Neelapaijit was born in Bangkok, Thailand where she grow up and graduated from Santa Cruz Convent school and the Faculty of Nurse, Mahidol University. Angkhana became the Human Rights activist after her husband who is a prominent Human Rights Lawyer was kidnapped by a group... Read More →
avatar for Phyllis Omido

Phyllis Omido

grassroots environmental activist and co- founder, Center for justice governance and environmental action
Phyllis Omido, is a Kenyan grassroots environmental activist and co- founder of the center for justice governance and environmental action an organization that advocates for the right to a clean and healthy environment and socioeconomic rights of marginalized and ignored communities... Read More →
avatar for Patrick Pouyanne

Patrick Pouyanne

Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer, TOTAL S.A.
Chairman of the Board and CEO, Total. He held positions in French administration, including Environment Advisor to the Prime Minister (1993-1995) and Chief of Staff to the Information Technology Minister (1995-1996). He joined Total in 1997 and became Group Representative in Qatar... Read More →
avatar for Leonardo Sakamoto

Leonardo Sakamoto

Member of Board of Trustees, United Nations Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery
Leonardo Sakamoto is journalist and has a PhD in Political Science. Member of the Board of Trustees of the United Nations Trust Fund on Contemporary Forms of Slavery since 2014 and the Financial Sector Commission on Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking (Liechtenstein Initiative) since... Read More →
avatar for Kailash Satyarthi

Kailash Satyarthi

2014 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Kailash Satyarthi Children's Foundation
Nobel Peace Laureate (2014) and Child Rights Activist Kailash SatyarthiFounder, Kailash Satyarthi Children’s Foundation - Ending violence against children globallyMr Satyarthi has been a tireless advocate of children’s rights for more than three decades. He and the grassroots... Read More →
avatar for Jeannette von Wolfersdorff

Jeannette von Wolfersdorff

Directora, Bolsa de Santiago
Director of the Santiago Securities Exchange, and President of its Corporate Governance and Sustainability Committee. Executive Director of the Chilean Fiscal Observatory, initiative from civil society to promote more effective and efficient public spending, and better accountability... Read More →


Monday November 26, 2018 11:00am - 1:00pm
Assembly Hall

1:45pm

Snapshot: Managing risks at the operational level ; lessons from Vinci in Qatar
 
Brief description of the presentation:
The French duty of vigilance law requires parent companies to identify and manage human-rights risks. How to take into account the highly operational nature of human rights issues and provide appropriate responses on the ground? This session is a case study as to how companies and international trade unions can work together collaboratively to address human rights risks at the country level in Qatar and find solutions in cases where human risks have risen.

Presentation objectives:
This presentation aims to provide a practical example of human rights risks management at a country level: Vinci’s risk management of living and working conditions in Qatar.

Speakers
JS

Jin Sook

Director, Building and Wood Workers’ International
avatar for Sarah Tesei

Sarah Tesei

Human Rights and Social Innovation Director, Vinci


Monday November 26, 2018 1:45pm - 2:00pm
Room XXIV

2:00pm

Snapshot: Lead and deploy the vigilance approach: a challenge for large companies; lessons from BNP and Orange

Brief description of the presentation:
The French law applies to large companies with international activities. It requires the implementation of a global risk prevention process (identification, evaluation, management and monitoring) covering different thematic areas within the company. How can we lead the process, promote cross-functionality and involve all stakeholders?

Presentation objectives:
This presentation aims to give two examples of companies for the deployment of an effective approach within large groups of companies: the example of Orange on how to work together and to build a shared vision; and the example of BNP Paribas on how to support the process through appropriate training actions.

Speakers
avatar for Emmanuelle Bru

Emmanuelle Bru

Head of Stakeholders dialogue and Human rights issues, BNP Paribas
avatar for Yves Nissim

Yves Nissim

VP Head of transformation and operation in CSR, Orange
Yves is deputy Chief CSR Officer of the Orange Group. His main field of expertise is Group CSR transformation, CSR reporting for the Group, stake holder dialogue and Human rights. He has carried Stake holder dialogue based on Orange CSR Strategy, in the main countries of the Orange... Read More →


Monday November 26, 2018 2:00pm - 2:15pm
Room XXIV

2:15pm

Snapshot: The French Duty of Vigilance - Lessons learned and Guidance on Vigilance Plans

Brief description of the presentation:
 This presentation will rely on the reference guidance on the duty of vigilance developed by Sherpa (the "VPRG"). It will give an overview of the aspects of published Vigilance Plans that most need improvement for the second round of implementation of the law in 2019. In particular, issues of disclosure and follow-up on implementation of vigilance measures will be addressed.

Presentation objectives: 
This presentation should inform civil society’s advocacy strategies around the Vigilance Law. The elements presented could also be of utmost importance for companies wanting to comply thoroughly with the law to circumvent the risk of litigation. Indeed, it should be recalled that the Law’s judicial enforcement mechanisms will be applicable from the spring 2019.

Speakers
avatar for Sandra Cossart

Sandra Cossart

Executive Director, Sherpa
Since 1 November 2017, Sandra Cossart is Sherpa’s director.Prior to this position, Sandra headed the Globalisation and Human Rights Program within Sherpa for almost 8 years. She was a leading voice on the need to change the legal framework so that legal structures would reflect... Read More →


Monday November 26, 2018 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Room XXIV

3:15pm

Snapshot: Employer Association Collaboration - Documenting Human Rights Due Diligence

Brief description of the presentation:
In this session, Sticks’n’Sushi, part of the REGA initiative, shares experiences conducting its first operational impact assessment as part of documenting HuRi through collaboration with other restaurants; and the potential for addressing systemic challenges for the industry in collaboration with peers.

Presentation objectives:

CEO Kim Rahbek presents on the influence the initiative has and the benefits it brings Sticks’n’Sushi.

Speakers
avatar for Kim Rahbek Hansen

Kim Rahbek Hansen

Founder & Restaurateur, Sticks’n’Sushi
Founder of Sticks'n'Sushi, present in Copenhagen, London and Berlin, focusing on conducting a sustainable business. Also spokesperson for REGA, Restaurateurs' Guarantee Association; the hospitality industry’s guarantee for responsible business conduct. The first of its kind. The... Read More →


Monday November 26, 2018 3:15pm - 3:30pm
Room XXIV

3:30pm

Snapshot: Investor Relations - Need to Document Human Rights Due Diligence

Brief description of the presentation:
This session both introduces the screening tool Polaris uses when assessing the degree of alignment with the UNGPs of potential investments and the process from engaging in partnership with the portfolio company to aligning with the UNGPs.
 
Presentation objectives:
In this snapshot session, Polaris presents the UNGPs application in investment.

Speakers
HB

Henrik Bonnerup

Partner and CFO, Polaris Management A/S


Monday November 26, 2018 3:30pm - 3:45pm
Room XXIV

3:45pm

Snapshot: Investor Relations - ICT Company Documenting Human Rights Due Diligence

Brief description of the presentation:
This snapshot session presents experiences with starting operational-level impact assessments at the headquarters of an ICT company.

Presentation objectives:
Configit shares examples of good practice documentation and the process of implementation of the UNGPs after entering into a partnership with Polaris.

Monday November 26, 2018 3:45pm - 4:00pm
Room XXIV

4:00pm

Snapshot: B2B Relations - Need to Document Human Rights Due Diligence

Brief description of the presentation:
In this session Schur International by referencing its work with the subsidiary Schur Packaging Denmark discusses how documented operational-level impact assessments are used when engaging with key suppliers, Stora Enso, but also downstream partners.

Presentation objectives:
The session also focuses on sharing experiences from creating a corporate culture around the commitment and engaging subsidiaries.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Jakobsen

Linda Jakobsen

Senior CSR Consultant, Schur International


Monday November 26, 2018 4:00pm - 4:15pm
Room XXIV

4:15pm

Snapshot: B2B Relations – Mutual Documentation of Human Rights Due Diligence

Brief description of the presentation:
In this snapshot session Stora Enso, an important supplier to Schur Packaging Denmark, presents on their work with HRDD and the need to be able to rely on business partners to respect human rights; and the reactions to the approach from Schur Packaging Denmark.

Presentation objectives:
This session focuses on what is sufficient in order to meet supplier and customer demands, and the potential of documented operational-level impact assessments to become standard to answer B2B expectations.

Speakers
avatar for Tiina Pursula

Tiina Pursula

Director, Sustainability, Stora Enso


Monday November 26, 2018 4:15pm - 4:30pm
Room XXIV

4:40pm

Human Rights in International Supply Chains - Where is the disconnect?


Organized by Global Compact Local Network (Brazil, China, Colombia, Denmark, France, Germany, Indonesia, Italy, Kenya, Korea, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, United Kingdom) and United Nations Global Compact

The Local Networks engaged in the coordination of this session have developed the following informal pre-read for this session, providing a snapshot of BHR initiatives of Local Networks of the UN Global Compact around the world. You can access the document here


Brief description of the session:
The UN Global Compact is the world’s largest corporate sustainability initiative, with over 9500 business participants from across all regions of the world. Crucially, Global Compact Local Networks operate in 71 countries to support businesses on their sustainability journey in their own regions. This session will present practical perspectives from across the world on the theme of:
Better connecting responsible businesses across global supply chains
Global Compact Local Networks operate across all regions of the world, and include companies from the bottom to the top of global supply chains. This segment brings together businesses at both ends of the supply chain, to address how responsible businesses on both sides can better connect to promote respect and support for human rights.
The Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights clarify that enterprises have an independent responsibility to respect human rights and that in order to do so they are required to exercise human rights due diligence. In a recent report on the state of play of corporate human rights due diligence in practice, the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights found that "Translating corporate policies into local contexts, for example in subsidiaries, is a challenge across sectors. There is typically a disconnect between the corporate level and implementation on the ground as well as gaps in internal alignment between functions and incentive structures. ...An apparent gap in current supply chain management is that human rights due diligence tends to be limited to tier-one companies."
The panellists will share their experience in implementing effective human rights due diligence across supply chains, and discuss some of the ways they and their partners are looking to improve supply chain management in the future. From the perspective of headquarters, a local subsidiary, and a local supplier, the panellists will examine how disconnects can arise between these actors - and identify some of the best ways to overcome them.

Session objectives:
  • Illustrate how the UNGPs are implemented in practice, , including some of the main challenges, existing good practice and potential areas for improvement
  • Identify the main “disconnects” in respecting human rights along supply chains between headquarters, subsidiaries and local suppliers
  • Build understanding on the role of human rights in procurement decisions
  • Portray good practices of companies from different regions

Format of the session:
Tentative Agenda:
  • Welcome (2 minutes)
  • Better connecting responsible businesses across global supply chains
    • Introductory Remarks by Sustainable Procurement & Human Rights Expert (10 minutes)
    • Moderated interactive discussion between business panellists (40 minutes)
    • Interventions from the floor from other LNs speakers (5 minutes)
    • Q&A and Discussion with the Audience (20 minutes)
  • Closing & Call to Action (3 minutes)

Audience Engagement 
 This session will engage the audience by using the Q&A and polling application slido,


Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Steve Kenzie

Steve Kenzie

Executive Director, Global Compact Network UK

Speakers
avatar for Linda Jakobsen

Linda Jakobsen

Senior CSR Consultant, Schur International
avatar for John Karakatsianis

John Karakatsianis

Corporate Citizenship Director, Avianca (Headquartes, Colombia)
avatar for Lise Kingo

Lise Kingo

CEO and Executive Director, UN Global Compact
Lise Kingo is the CEO and Executive Director of the United Nations Global Compact, which is the world’s largest corporate sustainability initiative with more than 13,500 signatories from 170 countries that have committed to aligning strategies and operations with universal principles... Read More →
avatar for Nathalie Komatisch

Nathalie Komatisch

Head of Human Rights Department, Total
avatar for Claus Teilmann Petersen

Claus Teilmann Petersen

Department Director, Human Rights and Business, Danish Institute for Human Rights
Claus Teilmann Petersen is Department Director at DIHR’s Human Rights and Business Department overseeing the Corporate Engagement and Business & Accountability programs. Claus is seated in United Nations Global Compact’s “Advisory Network of Experts” and an interim position... Read More →
avatar for Tantrie Soetjipto

Tantrie Soetjipto

Marketing Director, Board Of Commissioner of Panin Dubai Syariah Bank, Senior Adviser to IBEKA and Co-Founder Womenprene, PT Kampung Kearifan Indonesia (JAVARA)
Tantrie is a professional banker for over 25 years and for the past 2 years has decided to take the role as an Independent Commissioner for Panin Dubai Syariah Bank, Indonesia. This enables her to proactively support the growth of leading social enterprises and NGO's in Indonesia... Read More →
avatar for Yann Wyss

Yann Wyss

Senior Manager, Social & Environmental Impact, Nestlé
#humanrights #duediligence # reporting #globalsupplychains Yann Wyss joined Nestlé in 2011 as a Human Rights Specialist to develop and implement Nestlé’s Human Rights Due Diligence Program across the company’s operations and supply chain. He is now Senior Manager for Social... Read More →
avatar for Ramon Zumarraga

Ramon Zumarraga

Director of Purchasing Services in Iberdrola (Spain), Iberdrola
Although I've been in Purchasing for almost 20 years in Iberdrola, mainly in operative roles, my current role includes Supplier Development and Management. A key area that we've been trying to develop over the last years is CSR and Human Rights development in our supply chain.Resume... Read More →


Monday November 26, 2018 4:40pm - 6:00pm
Room XXIV
 
Tuesday, November 27
 

8:15am

Snapshot: Exiting responsibly - Respect for human rights in circumstances of urgent exit

Brief description of the session:
Human rights due diligence is an ongoing process that requires companies to maintain a “true picture” of its human rights risks over time. In particular, commentary to UN GP 18 notes that human rights impact assessments should be undertaken at regular intervals and specifically prior to “major decisions or changes in the operation”. While not explicitly mentioned in the commentary, one of the major decision a business can take is that of leaving a market and reducing or winding up operations. While this decision can be taken for purely commercial reasons, it can also be conditioned by changing political, economic or physical circumstances such as the eruption or intensification of war, the occurrence of natural disasters, the instatement of economic sanctions or even health crises. These events might impact the capacity of the company to identify, avoid and manage human rights risks and present renewed challenges for the company to fulfil its responsibility to respect human rights. How can companies wind down or exit operations responsibly under such circumstances?

Session objectives:
While the business and human rights debate has been focused on key corporate decisions such as market entry, new investments or the launching of new products or services, less attention has been given to questions of sales and market exit – especially in circumstances of urgent exit. The purpose of the snapshot session will be to raise awareness of this issue and spur interest in exploring the implications of the UNGPs.


Speakers
AS

Andrea Saldarriaga

Visiting Fellow (LSE) and Co-director IBR, London School of Economics and Political Science and the Iran Business Responsibility Project (IBR)


Tuesday November 27, 2018 8:15am - 8:30am
Room XXIV

8:30am

Snapshot: New insights. Projects from BHR Young researchers (I)

Brief description of the presentation: 
This snapshot sessions will be based on a forthcoming report compiled by four participants of our 2018 BHR Young Researchers Summit, titled Good Business: The Economic Case for Promoting Human Rights. The objective of this report is to offer a more nuanced, evidence-based assessment of the ‘business case’ for human rights. More specifically, the session engages with two clusters of arguments: The first cluster looks at the costs and benefits associated with embracing or ignoring human rights in the workplace and in community relations. It provides insight, for example, in the relation between employee loyalty and human rights respect, or the cost of conflict resolution measures in case of worsening community relations. The second cluster demonstrates how governments are increasingly using economic leverage as a tool to promote corporate respect for human rights. The utilization of human rights standards in public procurement contracts or in the provision of export credits will be among the examples of how countries implementing the UNGPs have started to create economic incentives for businesses to respect human rights.

Presentation objectives:
The session will present the arguments underscoring the growing evidence that respecting human rights is not only a moral imperative for business, but is increasingly turning into an economic necessity.


Speakers
avatar for Basak Baglayan

Basak Baglayan

Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Luxembourg
avatar for Marisa McVey

Marisa McVey

PhD Candidate, University of St. Andrews
I'm a second year PhD Researcher at the University of St Andrews in Scotland. My research focuses on the UNGPs, corporate accountability and communities.


Tuesday November 27, 2018 8:30am - 8:45am
Room XXIV

8:45am

Snapshot: New insights. Projects from BHR Young researchers (II)

Brief description of the presentation:
This snapshot sessions will be based on a forthcoming report compiled by four participants of our 2018 BHR Young Researchers Summit, titled Good Business: The Economic Case for Promoting Human Rights. The objective of this report is to offer a more nuanced, evidence-based assessment of the ‘business case’ for human rights. More specifically, the session engages with two clusters of arguments: The first cluster analyzes the costs and benefits associated with corporate abuse-related lawsuits, such as information-disclosure cost or reputational damage and it shows the effects of lawsuits on the share price of companies. The second cluster assesses the complex role of consumers and investors in driving responsible business behaviour as well as of new legislation that increases not least the demands of businesses towards each other.

Presentation objectives:
The session will discuss the arguments underscoring the growing evidence that respecting human rights is not only a moral imperative for business, but is increasingly turning into an economic necessity.



Speakers
avatar for Ingrid Landau

Ingrid Landau

Lecturer, Monash Business School, Monash University
avatar for Kebene Wodajo

Kebene Wodajo

PhD Candidate, Shanghai Jiao Tong University


Tuesday November 27, 2018 8:45am - 9:00am
Room XXIV

9:30am

Snapshot: Human Rights Due Diligence in the Pharmaceutical Supply Chain

Brief description of the presentation:
The right to health, and the underlying access to medicine, is one of the obvious salient human rights in the pharmaceutical sector. However, pharmaceutical companies recognize that there are other salient human rights issues that need to be addressed when considering right-holders across the entire value chain, in their own operations and throughout their supply chains.

Presentation objectives:
This session will provide some insights into the Pharmaceutical Supply Chain Initiative (PSCI) and how the member companies are collaborating to define, implement and champion responsible supply chain practices, including the respect for human rights.


Speakers
avatar for Connie Low

Connie Low

Head Third Party Labor Rights, Novartis


Tuesday November 27, 2018 9:30am - 9:45am
Room XXIV

9:45am

Snapshot: Samsung - Human rights due diligence across the supply chain – Experiences from practice

Brief description of the presentation:
This snapshot presentation will discuss key elements of Samsung Electronics’ continuous journey on human rights due diligence, including practical experiences in aligning its business activities with the UN Guiding Principles.

Presentation objectives:
Samsung Electronics will share selected cases of the implementation of its commitment with regards to human rights due diligence, with examples from our global operations.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Kromjong

Linda Kromjong

Global Labor & Human Rights Director, Samsung Electronics
CL

Caleb Lee

VP Corporate Affairs Europe, Samsung Electronics


Tuesday November 27, 2018 9:45am - 10:00am
Room XXIV

10:00am

Snapshot: Human rights due diligence across the supply chain – Experiences from practice

Description of the presentation:
The second pillar of the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights requires businesses to conduct human rights due diligence not only within its business activity but also for those with whom the business may be directly linked. To name a few, these are the contractors, transporters, and those within the supply chain and value chain.

Presentation objectives:
The presentation will cover the challenges faced in conducting human rights due diligence in the supply chain. Aditya Birla has initiated work towards human rights due diligence in the supply chain. Some practices followed to overcome the challenges will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Vidya Tikoo

Vidya Tikoo

Senior Vice President, Sustainability, Aditya Birla Management Corporation Pvt. Ltd.
A sustainable business expert, can work out strategies for businesses and conglomerates. Have worked in the areas of environment, transportation, human rights, occupational health, safety, supply chain linked with sustainability of businesses


Tuesday November 27, 2018 10:00am - 10:15am
Room XXIV

10:15am

Snapshot: How can business association promote human rights due diligence. Experiences from Japan

Brief description of the presentation :
The presentation will introduce how Keidanren, one of the main business organizations in Japan, plays an active role in leading Japanese corporations to respect human rights as well as to promote human rights due diligence (HRDD) in accordance with the UN Guiding Principle on Business and Human Rights.

Presentation objectives:
To explain Keidanren's Charter of Corporate Behavior and the concept of "Society 5.0 for SDGs".
The presentation will also share some data on how Japanese companies respect human rights and promote HRDD in their business.

Speakers
TH

Tomoko Hasegawa

Director, SDGs Promotion Bureau, Keidanren (Japan Business Federation)


Tuesday November 27, 2018 10:15am - 10:30am
Room XXIV

10:30am

Snapshot: Human rights due diligence - Challenges and business pathways (case of the project operator)

Brief presentation of the presentation:
Sakhalin Energy will present the main challenges that a large project operator encounters when introducing and implementing human rights standards across supply chain partners, as well as the practical tools from the company’s experience allowing to address these challenges.

Presentation objectives:
The session will focus on thorough bidding process, human rights inclusive contract management, trainings/awareness raising for internal/external stakeholders, tools of contractors’ monitoring and audits.

Speakers
VZ

Valentin Zhovtun

Social Performance Specialist, Sakhalin Energy Investment Company Ltd.


Tuesday November 27, 2018 10:30am - 10:45am
Room XXIV

10:45am

Snapshot: Strengthening human rights due diligence with in-depth assessment and radical transparency

Brief description of the presentation:
S Group is a Finnish consumer owned cooperative group operating in the supermarket, department store and hardware trade, service station store and fuel sales and the travel industry and hospitality business. Expectations on human rights due diligence of businesses are growing, while implementing supply chain due diligence practices can be very challenging in practice. S Group has explored existing practices and identified innovative tools and methods for practical implementation of human rights due diligence.

Presentation objectives: 
In this snapshot presentation, S Group will share its experience and showcase concept for in-depth human rights impact assessment. The human rights impact assessment concept was developed to strengthen supply chain due diligence and to gain information of the root causes of the human rights issues.

Speakers
avatar for Lea Rankinen

Lea Rankinen

SVP Sustainability, SOK Corporation


Tuesday November 27, 2018 10:45am - 11:00am
Room XXIV

11:00am

Snapshot: Human rights due diligence in a large supply chain

Brief description of the presentation:
UPM is committed to sustainable forest management and monitors the origin of wood to ensure it is sustainably and legally sourced. The presentation will describe human rights due diligence process in large supply base covering several sourcing categories, involving more than 25000 suppliers. It will also bring practical examples of risk assessment within chemicals sourcing.

Presentation objectives: 
The presentation will describe UPM's approach in managing human rights risk in supply chain. It will introduce a practical case on chemicals sourcing and elaborate on opportunities for further development.

Speakers
avatar for Nina Norjama

Nina Norjama

Director, Social Responsibility, UPM


Tuesday November 27, 2018 11:00am - 11:15am
Room XXIV

11:15am

Snapshot: Human rights due diligence - Building on what works in a global supply chain. An overview of risk assessment

Brief description of the presentation:
Outotec develops leading technologies and services for the sustainable use of Earth’s natural resources in the mining, metal, energy, and chemical industries. The presentation will provide an overview of how to manage the human rights risks in a global supply chain, focusing on the practices and challenges of a globally operating technology company.

Presentation objectives: 
The objective of the presentation is to describe the current practical ways of assessing supply chain risks and related approach adopted at Outotec. This includes finding the key assessment areas and managing the classification, assessment and audit process, and the related challenges.

Speakers
avatar for Tea Maasalo

Tea Maasalo

Director, Corporate Legal and Corporate Responsibility, Outotec


Tuesday November 27, 2018 11:15am - 11:30am
Room XXIV

11:30am

Snapshot: Human rights due diligence across supply chain starts with due diligence with internal stakeholder groups

Brief description of the presentation:
Neste is an important producer of renewable diesel and a refiner of high-quality oil products that enable customers to reduce their climate emissions. Neste’s approach on human rights due diligence is centered on activities to assess and identify the potential impacts on human rights of our various internal functions and business areas, including those that concerns sourcing. This is followed by actions to increase the preparedness of internal management systems to mitigate human rights risks.

Presentation objectives:
The presentation will shade light on the current activities aimed at, amongst others, improving Neste’s sourcing practices on due diligence that is strengthened with human rights criteria, coupled with capacity building and supplier engagements.

Speakers
avatar for Yan Peng Ng

Yan Peng Ng

Sustainability Specialist, Neste Corporation, Finland


Tuesday November 27, 2018 11:30am - 11:45am
Room XXIV

11:30am

Human rights due diligence across value chains - addressing systemic challenges
Interpretation is provided into Spanish and Korean.

Organized by the Global Business Initiative on Human Rights in collaboration with the Responsible Business Alliance

Brief description of the session:
This session will focus on how and why companies approach implementing human rights due diligence across their value chains to identify and address (in coordination and collaboration with others) systemic human rights impacts.
Participants will gain an opportunity to explore the complexity of value chains in today’s globalised economy, and how business practitioners map and seek to understand their company’s value chain. We will also examine how practitioners conduct human rights due diligence across vast and complex value chains – with an emphasis on opportunities to promote collaboration and communication across entities in the value chain to more efficiently identify and address adverse impacts. The session will incorporate emerging practice and perspectives from panellists and members of the ‘audience’. The session will conclude with observations as to what is needed to enhance and scale value chain due diligence.

Session objectives:
Through this session, we will seek to:
  • Strengthen understanding of the complexity of today’s value chains and business relationships – and how this complexity impacts efforts to implement human rights due diligence.
  • Explore how business practitioners are mapping and visualising their value chains, including key challenges and innovations.
  • Share how companies across industries are working to enhance their due diligence in key parts of the value chain, including by strengthening communication and coordination.
  • Identify practical opportunities to enhance and scale value chain due diligence going forwards.

Key discussion questions:
  • How can business practitioners strengthen their (and stakeholders’) visibility of complex value chains?
  • How are business practitioners (individually and collectively) working to identify and respond to human rights impacts across their companies’ value chains?

Session format:
This session will commence with a discussion amongst the speakers and the audience about the complexity of modern value chains. We will invite 2-3 companies from different industries to share, briefly, an overview of their companies’ value chains and discuss how this changes over time.
We will then explore the challenges companies confront when undertaking value chain due diligence (including that of prioritisation) through a series of mini-case studies. These case studies will offer participants insight into how companies in different industries are implementing human rights due diligence in various parts of their value chains – for example, to assess risks in specific business relationships (i.e. customers, JV partners, suppliers), sourcing decisions (i.e. particular components or raw materials) and production phases (i.e. manufacturing, processing, recycling). The session will not aim to be comprehensive, but rather to give participants a sense of innovative and less-visible aspects of companies’ efforts to identify and manage issues across their value chains. We will also discuss key tools available to companies to support these efforts.
Throughout the session, we will encourage active participation from the audience, and will ask business participants to come prepared to share their own insights and experiences.

Background to the discussion:
In today’s globalised economy, companies are under increasing pressure to identify and respond to adverse human rights impacts in their value chains. Value chains are extremely complex. Most companies have hundreds of customers, suppliers and other business partners – and these typically provide services to more than one industry sector. Major brands have been under particular pressure to ‘cascade’ expectations and standards ‘down’ their supply chains. Suppliers and other business-to-business companies are also increasingly expected to meet their customers’ standards, to be alert to human rights risks downstream – that is, impacts they may be involved in through their customers and clients. For most companies, undertaking human rights due diligence across the value chain will indeed require assessing a multitude of different types of business relationships, products and operations.
Companies working to respond to these pressures face additional challenges presented by the extensive nature of major global value chains, and the complexity and multi-faceted nature of the many business relationships within it. Knowing what the value chain ‘looks like’ is key to enabling robust approaches to identify and respond to adverse human rights impacts. But knowing is also only the start. Even with good visibility of entities within a company’s value chain, implementing effective human rights due diligence processes to identify and understand risks in the value chain requires companies to work together. It also requires the development of creative and smart strategies to navigate issues of scale and find efficiencies, the use of leverage as appropriate and the identification of appropriate ways to prioritise (where necessary).

Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Andrea Shemberg

Andrea Shemberg

Co-Chair, Global Business Initiative on Human Rights (GBI)

Speakers
avatar for Tony Khaw

Tony Khaw

Director, Corporate Social Responsibility, NXP
Tony joined NXP in Jan 2013 to lead the Social Responsibility/Compliance (SR) function. This includes the deployment of the program to the supply chain. Tony and the SR team, based in Singapore, is also responsible for supporting NXP’s compliance to customers’ SR programs. The... Read More →
RL

Rob Lederer

Executive Director, Responsible Business Alliance (RBA)
avatar for James Nicholson

James Nicholson

Head of Corporate Responsibility, Trafigura
James is Head of Corporate Responsibility at Trafigura. In 2010, James joined Trafigura in order to help establish a Corporate Affairs department. Areas of focus at the present day include developing and driving the Group’s responsibility and transparency policies worldwide, for... Read More →
avatar for Vanessa Zimmerman

Vanessa Zimmerman

CEO, Pillar Two
Vanessa is a recognised global and domestic corporate sustainability expert focusing on human rights. Originally an anti-trust lawyer, Vanessa specialised in business and human rights, working for five years as a Legal Advisor to the UN Special Representative on Business and Human... Read More →


Tuesday November 27, 2018 11:30am - 1:00pm
Room XVII

11:30am

Trends and challenges in promoting business respect for human rights in Africa
Interpretation is provided in English and French.


Organized by the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights

Brief description of the session: 

This Forum session is part of the Forum track on trends and challenges in promoting business respect for human rights in the context of each region of the world. Building on the sessions on government action on the Forum’s first day, the region focused discussions aim to take a closer look at how to overcome key business-related human rights challenges faced in African countries and lessons learned from emerging government, business and civil society action.

Objective of the session: 

Facilitate multi-stakeholder dialogue around lessons learned and the way forward, including on how to scale up emerging good practice and strengthen a race to the top among governments and business in the region.

Format of the session:

The proposed session will be done in a talk show format with the participants having the opportunity to raise questions amongst each other as in a public dialogue. The session is chaired by the Member of the UN Working Group, Githu Muigai

Preliminary agenda: 
  • Introduction by The UN Working Group member, Githu Muigai
  • Kickoff remarks:
    • Civil society coalition reflections on how to overcome key business-related human rights challenges in the region and what emerging practices to build on
    • Business perspectives on how to drive a race to the top in the region
    • Government statements on lessons learned and commitments for going forward
  • Roundtable discussion

Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Githu Muigai

Githu Muigai

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Mr. Githu Muigai is current Associate Professor of Law, Department of Public Law, University of Nairobi; Chairman at the Council of Legal Education in Kenya; and Senior Partner, Mohammed & Muigai Advocates. He previously served as a Commissioner with the former Constitution of Kenya... Read More →

Speakers
MD

Mutuso Dhliwayo

Director, Zimbabwe Environmental Law Association
Mutuso Dhliwayo is a public interest environmental lawyer working with the Zimbabwe Environmental Law Association ( ZELA). ZELA works to promote democracy, good governance and sustainable development using natural resources as a framework.ZELA has been working on business and human... Read More →
avatar for Guillain Koko

Guillain Koko

Project Coordinator, Africa Coalition for Corporate Accountability (ACCA)
Guillain Koko is a Social Justice activist and Human rights Lawyer, with particular experience/expertise in Business and Human Rights.He is the project coordinator of the African Coalition for Corporate Accountability (ACCA). He holds a Law Degree (LLB) in Public Law, from the Catholic... Read More →
avatar for Mthunzi Mdwaba

Mthunzi Mdwaba

CEO, TZoro IBC
Mthunzi Perry-Mason Mdwaba is an entrepreneur, businessman, executive and passionate advocate for business in all its diverse forms and across developing and developed nations. He is a fierce defender of skills development, the conditions required for sustainable enter-prises and... Read More →


Tuesday November 27, 2018 11:30am - 1:00pm
Room XXIII

11:45am

Snapshot: Konica Minolta - What motivates this global technology company’s commitment to human rights and what outcomes have been achieved – experiences from practice

Brief description of the presentation:
Konica Minolta Australia will present its experiences in implementing an extensive range of community engagement programs and championing a broad range of social justice issues, including advocating for an Australian Modern Slavery Act which would compel Australian companies above a specified revenue threshold to report annually to government on their initiatives to ensure their supply chains are free from modern slavery and other forms of human rights abuse. Among aspects covered, the presentation will share insights from building capability to manage human rights risks in the supply chain ahead of being compelled to by legislation. The presentation will feature experiences and the unintended positive outcomes around growth in staff engagement and enhanced commercial outcomes.

Presentation objectives:
Sharing experiences and the unintended positive outcomes around growth in staff engagement and enhanced commercial outcomes.

Speakers
avatar for David Cooke

David Cooke

Chair & Managing Director, Konica Minolta Business Solutions Australia
As well as managing Konica Minolta (a global Japanese tech company) in Australia I am also a non-executive director of the UN Global Compact Network in Australia and of Sustainalytics (a global ESG research & analysis firm). My human rights work has been focused on ending human trafficking... Read More →


Tuesday November 27, 2018 11:45am - 12:00pm
Room XXIV

1:30pm

Reinforcing the importance of human rights due diligence for realizing the SDGs
Organized by Shift, Business and Human Rights Resource Centre (BHRRC), Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR), Oxfam

Brief description of the session and objectives:
The overall purpose of this event is to deepen our understanding of the relationship between the SDGs and the business and human rights agenda from the viewpoint of various stakeholders. More specifically, our objectives are:
  • To discuss the evolving relationship between the SDGs and business and human rights from the perspective of business, civil society, government, and other stakeholders.
  • To identify key barriers (cultural, institutional, etc.) that prevent greater integration of human rights considerations and approaches into companies’ engagement on the SDGs.
  • To develop strategies for how to better ensure that respect for human rights is at the center of every company’s efforts toward contributing to the Global Goals.
Key discussion questions:
  1. What are the major trends, areas of progress, and gaps in corporate strategies and actions on the SDGs?
  2. What are the main barriers that are holding back deeper synergy between the SDGs and the business and human rights agenda?
  3. What can business, civil society, governments, investors, and other actors do to help make elements of the business and human rights agenda (e.g. ‘Respect, Protect, Access to Remedy,’ human rights due diligence) a cornerstone of companies’ SDG engagement?
Format of the session:
To encourage multi-stakeholder dialogue, we propose a workshop-style session to crowdsource input into the discussion questions outlined above. Following a set of scene-setting presentations, small group discussions will offer an opportunity for participants to add to the conversation, and the plenary discussion at the end will capture key takeaways and opportunities for further collaboration.


Setting the scene: The state of play on business, the SDGs, and human rights (35 min) 

Small group discussions (20 min)
In groups up to 20 people, the following questions will be discussed:
  • What examples of good practice are we seeing in positioning human rights at the heart of SDG engagement?
  • What are the barriers in ensuring an integrated approach to business respect for human rights and contributions to the SDGs?
  • What can we do, individually and collectively, to tackle these barriers?
Plenary discussion and wrap-up (20 min) 
  • Report back from small group discussions by table leads
  • Collating feedback and facilitated discussion of emergent themes and findings
  • Group Discussion and plenary moderated by Phil Bloomer, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre 

Background to the discussion:
Three years since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) continue to gain momentum within the business community. More than 90% of the SDG targets are linked to international human rights and labor standards. Ensuring respect for human rights – an inherently creative and innovative process – is thus one of the most important contributions to the SDGs that businesses can make. In addressing negative human rights impacts connected to business activity, companies that take this approach will be delivering hugely positive outcomes for people.
Yet, few companies are linking their SDG engagement with their commitment to human rights. While the number of companies embracing the SDGs and making commitments to respecting human rights continues to grow, many of them are treating the SDGs and human rights as separate areas of engagement. As a result, there is a risk that company strategies and actions on the SDGs do not meaningfully address human rights impacts associated with corporate operations and supply chains.
The lack of knowledge regarding business’ SDG contributions and the relationship between the SDGs and the business and human rights agenda represents a problem for all stakeholder groups. A new debate is urgently needed if we want to ensure that human rights form the cornerstone of any business strategy or action aimed at contributing to the Global Goals.
 
 Interpretation is provided in Korean.

Speakers
PB

Phil Bloomer

Executive Director, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre
avatar for James Gomme

James Gomme

Director, Sustainable Development Goals, World Business Council for Sustainable Development
James Gomme is Director of Sustainable Development Goals at the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), a business membership organization comprised of some 200 multinational corporations that come together to coordinate and scale up solutions to create a sustainable... Read More →
avatar for Cynthia Trigo Paz

Cynthia Trigo Paz

Human Rights Senior Advisor, TOTAL
As a social and human rights expert I advise Total on assessing and addressing human rights risks and impacts associated to its operations and business relations.
avatar for Claus Teilmann Petersen

Claus Teilmann Petersen

Department Director, Human Rights and Business, Danish Institute for Human Rights
Claus Teilmann Petersen is Department Director at DIHR’s Human Rights and Business Department overseeing the Corporate Engagement and Business & Accountability programs. Claus is seated in United Nations Global Compact’s “Advisory Network of Experts” and an interim position... Read More →
avatar for Irit Tamir

Irit Tamir

Director of Oxfam America's Private Sector Department, OXFAM


Tuesday November 27, 2018 1:30pm - 2:45pm
Room XXI

3:00pm

Trends and challenges in promoting business respect for human rights in "Western Europe and Others" region (WEOG)
Interpretation is provided into English, French and Spanish
Watch live ​​​https://unog.webex.com/unog/j.php?MTID=mabe7bc8e92ec6e11557311bcf357f4b9

Organized by the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights

Brief description of the session: 
This Forum session is part of the Forum track on trends and challenges in promoting business respect for human rights in the context of each region of the world. Building on the sessions on government action on the Forum’s first day, the “Western European and others”- focused discussions aim to take a closer look at policy innovations and emerging practices on which progress can be built. The session will involve presentations by governments that are moving ahead with regulatory and policy innovations.

Objectives of the session: 
  • Share lessons learned from recent government efforts with potential to drive greater policy coherence and reach scale in business implementation of the corporate responsibility to respect human right
  • Facilitate multi-stakeholder dialogue around lessons learned and way forward, including on how to strengthen a race to the top among Western countries.
Format of the session:
  • Introduction by the UN Working Group on Business & Human Rights
  • Snapshot presentations on innovations and lessons learned: inter-governmental and government perspectives
  • Open stakeholder discussion on the way forward


Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Anita Ramasastry

Anita Ramasastry

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Ms. Anita Ramasastry is the Roland L. Hjorth Professor of Law and the Director of the Graduate Program in Sustainable International Development at the University of Washington School Of Law. She researches and teaches in the fields of law and development, anti-corruption, international... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ulrika Lyckman Alnered

Ulrika Lyckman Alnered

Deputy director, Department for Promotion of Sweden, Trade and CSR, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Sweden
Sustainable Business, Anti-corruption, Business and Human Rights
BB

Barbara Bijelic

Legal Expert, Responsible Business Conduct, OECD
avatar for Alva Bruun

Alva Bruun

Senior adviser, human rights, Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland
Alva is Senior Adviser at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland. Her main duties lie within the business human rights-sphere, in the Political Department as well as the Department for Development Policy. She's overseeing various of the ministry's projects implemented with the... Read More →
RC

Robert Coleman

Director, Trade Planning, Coordination and Responsible Business Practices, Global Affairs Canada
avatar for Iona Ebben

Iona Ebben

Senior Policy Officer Business & Human Rights, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Netherlands
avatar for Katharina Hermann

Katharina Hermann

Head of Helpdesk on Business and Human Rights, Government of Germany
avatar for Julius Langendorff

Julius Langendorff

Policy Officer Trade & Sustainable Development, European Commission, DG Trade
avatar for Geneviève Jean- van Rossum

Geneviève Jean- van Rossum

Représentante spéciale chargée de la bioéthique et de la responsabilité sociale des entreprises, Ministère francais de l’Europe et des Affaires étrangères
avatar for Camilla Røssaak

Camilla Røssaak

Counsellor, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Norway


Tuesday November 27, 2018 3:00pm - 4:20pm
Room XXI

3:00pm

Trends and challenges in promoting business respect for human rights in Eastern Europe
Interpretation is provided in English and Russian.

Organized by the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights

Brief description of the session: 

This Forum session is part of the Forum track on trends and challenges in promoting business respect for human rights in the context of each region of the world. Building on the sessions on government action on the Forum’s first day, the region focused discussions aim to take a closer look at how to overcome key business-related human rights challenges faced in Eastern European countries and lessons learned from emerging government, business and civil society action.

Objectives of the session: 

- Facilitate multi-stakeholder dialogue around lessons learned and the way forward, including on how to scale up emerging good practice
- Strengthen a race to the top among governments and business in the region

Format of the session:

The proposed session will be done in a talk show format with the participants having the opportunity to raise questions amongst each other as in a public dialogue. The session is chaired by the Member of the UN Working Group, Elzbieta Karksa

Preliminary agenda: 
  • Introduction by Elzbieta Karska
  • Kickoff remarks:
    • Civil society coalition reflections on how to overcome key business-related human rights challenges in the region and what emerging practices to build on
    • Business perspectives on how to drive a race to the top in the region
    • Government statements on lessons learned and commitments for going forward
  • Roundtable discussion


Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Elżbieta Karska

Elżbieta Karska

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Ms. Elżbieta Karska is a Professor and the Head of the Department of Protection of Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law and the Director of the Institute of International Law, European Union and International Relations at the Faculty of Law and Administration, Cardinal... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mark Fodor

Mark Fodor

Executive Director, CEE Bankwatch Network
CEE Bankwatch Network‘s mission is to prevent environmentally and socially harmful impacts of international development finance, and to promote alternative solutions and public participation.
avatar for Zurabishvili Salome

Zurabishvili Salome

Executive Director, CiDA / Global Compact Network Georgia
Human Rights Lawyer and Corporate Sustainability Expert with 7+ years of experience in the civil society, public sector and consulting business sector around corporate sustainability issues. Salome is executive director of civil society organisation - CiDA, which has been promoting... Read More →


Tuesday November 27, 2018 3:00pm - 4:20pm
Room XXIII

3:00pm

Addressing “modern slavery” in supply chains – Company responses
Interpretation is provided into Spanish.

Session organized by the Responsible Business Alliance and The Consumer Goods Forum.

Brief description of the session:
According to International Labour Organization (ILO), approximately 24.9 million people worldwide are in conditions of forced labor. Supply chains include hundreds of thousands of workers who seek to make a better life for themselves and their families.
Many are subject to conditions that may contribute to forced labor, including high recruitment fees, personal debt, complicated recruitment practices, a lack of transparency about their eventual working conditions, and inadequate legal protections in the countries in which they work.
Guiding principles on forced labor are well-established, however, solutions tend to be fragmented across industries and geographies and only address certain aspects or specific points in a worker’s journey.  Due diligence on forced labor should be harmonized across multiple industries that share recruitment supply chain to drive labor market transformation through collective action.
This session will provide testimonials from companies across multiple sectors on how they address forced labor in their operations and supply chains.  It will review core process to operationalize supply chain due diligence on forced labor while exploring collective action needed with stakeholders to address the root causes of this issue.

Format of the discussion:
The session will be organized via a series of speaker remarks, expert interventions and multimedia content. Session moderators will bring to life the opportunities created by harmonizing obligations, policies, initiatives, and expectations to tackle this difficult issue.
To ground the session, we will use real world examples from companies across industries on the opportunities and challenges in devising solutions.  Speakers from civil society will bring perspectives on remediation, remedy and transparency.  Finally the broader topic will be explored by asking participants to consider how business can work collectively as well as with other stakeholders, to address root causes of forced labor.

Programme:
15:00 – 15:10  Introductory remarks and framing of issue
15:10 - 15:50   Part 1 – Business Responses
15:50 – 16:05  Part 2 – Stakeholder Perspectives
16:05-16:20     Part 3 – Question/Answer and way forward 

Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Bob Mitchell

Bob Mitchell

Vice President, Responsible Business Alliance
As Vice President at the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA), Bob leads the strategy development and implementation for environmental and human rights programs. He is a 16-year veteran of Hewlett Packard and Hewlett Packard Enterprise, with over 11 years in sustainability. He was... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Didier Bergeret

Didier Bergeret

Director Social Sustainability & SSCI, The Consumer Goods Forum
Didier Bergeret is Director of Social Sustainability and the Sustainable Supply Chain Initiative (SSCI). The main focus of his work is to develop collaborative and practical solutions for the industry to advance responsible supply chains. He notably supports the implementation of... Read More →
avatar for Jay Celorie

Jay Celorie

Human Rights Officer, Sustainability, HP, Inc
RL

Rob Lederer

Executive Director, Responsible Business Alliance (RBA)
avatar for Caroline Meledo

Caroline Meledo

Senior Manager, Corporate Responsibility & Human Rights, HILTON
Caroline has developed and leads on the implementation of Hilton’s global human rights strategy. Before joining Hilton’s HQ a year ago, Caroline set up and led Hilton’s Corporate Responsibility team for Europe, Middle East and Africa in 2013. Previously, Caroline worked in the... Read More →
avatar for Ashley Orbach

Ashley Orbach

Head of Human Rights and External Engagement, Supplier Responsibility, Apple, Inc
avatar for Christa Hayden Sharpe

Christa Hayden Sharpe

Vice President for Southeast Asia Regional Operations, International Justice Mission
IJM is a global human rights NGO that equips governments to sustainably and effectively enforce their laws to protect the vulnerable from exploitation and violence. Through a foundation of high-quality, end-to-end investigations, legal and aftercare services, we ensure mentorship-based... Read More →
avatar for Tom Smith

Tom Smith

Director, External Stakeholder Strategy, Responsible Sourcing, Walmart
avatar for Barbara Wettstein

Barbara Wettstein

Public Affairs Manager, Nestlé S.A
avatar for Peter Paul van de Wijs

Peter Paul van de Wijs

Chief External Affairs Officer, Global Reporting Initiative (GRI)
As head of GRI’s External Affairs team, Peter Paul is responsible driving effective advocacy for GRI, for developing and implementing GRI’s global internal and external communications strategy and maintaining the external relations.Peter Paul has over 20 years of professional... Read More →


Tuesday November 27, 2018 3:00pm - 4:20pm
Room XVII

4:30pm

Snapshot: Children’s Rights and Business Atlas: Harnessing the power of data in risk and impact assessments.
Interpretation is provided in English and Spanish

Brief description of the presentation:
Business impacts children everywhere. Children interact daily with the private sector – as family members of workers, employees, consumers, and community members affected by operations and supply chains. The Children’s Rights and Business Atlas is an online tool that uses a wide range of data analysis and manipulation to help transform this interaction and help businesses, investors and industry organizations understand how their actions impact children’s rights globally.

Presentation objectives: 

To discuss how the Children’s Rights and Business Atlas provides a quantitative assessment of children’s rights across 195 countries and territories to offer a comprehensive understanding of how actions impact children’s rights, and the degree to which children’s rights are respected, across the globe in the Workplace, at the Marketplace, and within the Community and Environment. The Atlas harnesses the power of data to bring pragmatic and user-friendly insight into the complex narrative of children’s’ rights, helping provide risk and impact assessment. The Atlas is designed to help business, government and industry stakeholders better understand their impact on children through the use of publicly available country data, industry analysis and practical guidance.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Hallberg

Martin Hallberg

Children’s rights and business atlas manager, Global Child Forum
Sustainability and development professional driven by all things that make us human, such as connection, laughter, movement and learning for example. As the Global Child Forum’s Children’s Rights and Business Atlas Manager, I work with businesses and strategic partners in order... Read More →
avatar for Beth Linnea Verhey

Beth Linnea Verhey

Senior Adviser, Children’s Rights and Business, UNICEF
I am Senior Advisor on Children's Rights and Business with UNICEF.Talk to me about Integrating children's and human rights in business due diligence.And our new global data platform for business risk and impact analysis - https://www.childrensrightsatlas.org/country-data/workplac... Read More →


Tuesday November 27, 2018 4:30pm - 4:45pm
Room XXIV

4:40pm

Trends and challenges in promoting business respect for human rights in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC)
Interpretation is provided into English/French/Spanish

Organized by the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights

Brief description of the session: 
This Forum session is part of the Forum track on trends and challenges in promoting business respect for human rights in the context of each region of the world. Building on the sessions on government action on the Forum’s first day, the region focused discussions aim to take a closer look at how to overcome key business-related human rights challenges faced in Latin American and Caribbean countries and lessons learned from emerging government, business and civil society action.

Objectives of the session: 
- Facilitate multi-stakeholder dialogue around lessons learned and the way forward, including on how to scale up emerging good practice
- Strengthen a race to the top among governments and business in the region.

Format of the session:
The proposed session will be done in a talk show format with the participants having the opportunity to raise questions amongst each other as in a public dialogue. The session is chaired by the Chairperson of the UN Working Group, Dante Pesce

Preliminary agenda: 
  • Introduction by Dante Pesce
  • Kickoff remarks:
    • Civil society coalition reflections on how to overcome key business-related human rights challenges in the region and what emerging practices to build on
    • Business perspectives on how to drive a race to the top in the region
    • Human rights defender statement on his/her experience in working for the respect of human rights by business in the region
    • Government statements on lessons learned and commitments for going forward
  • Roundtable discussion


Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Dante Pesce

Dante Pesce

Chairperson, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Mr. Dante Pesce holds a Masters in Political Science from the Catholic University of Chile and a Masters in Public Administration from Harvard University. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the VINCULAR Center for Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development at the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Fernanda Hopenhaym

Fernanda Hopenhaym

Co-Executive Director, PODER
AL

Ana Laynez

Indigenous authority, Ixil indigenous community, Guatemala
avatar for Carolina Mejia Micolta

Carolina Mejia Micolta

Counsel at Legal Vicepresidency, Asociación Nacional de Empresarios de Colombia


Tuesday November 27, 2018 4:40pm - 6:00pm
Room XXI

4:45pm

Snapshot: Economic evidence for civic rights protection
Interpretation is provided in English and Spanish

Description of the presentation:
This “snapshot” presentation will outline the economic argument for why business should be concerned about the global crackdown on civic rights and civil society. In October, The B Team released The Business Case for Protecting Civic Rights, to examine the economic impact of respect for civic rights and civic space. The Business Case for Protecting Civic Rights utilises data from the Varieties of Democracy Institute (V-Dem) to augment the business case for action and explore how a better business environment is linked to greater civic rights and freedoms.

Presentation objectives: 
We plan to speak alongside a company representative that can explain why the protection of civic rights is important to their business operations and their commitment to the UN Guiding Principles

Speakers
avatar for Annabel Lee Hogg

Annabel Lee Hogg

Manager, Governance and Transparency, The B Team
avatar for Michael Karimian

Michael Karimian

Senior Manager, Human Rights, Microsoft


Tuesday November 27, 2018 4:45pm - 5:00pm
Room XXIV

6:15pm

Protecting human rights in Public Policy: What Role for Business?
Organized by BSR and The B Team

Session objectives:
The discussion will consider a number of key questions on the minds of business executives, policymakers and civil society. Key objectives include:
  • Identifying risks and opportunities for business and investors to improve overall protection for human rights while also improving the business environment
  • Sharing examples of business or investor engagement in policy that support human rights, and identifying pressure points from stakeholders
  • Acknowledging the critique of undue corporate influence in public spheres, which may undermine rights or deepen inequality, explore and discuss holistic corporate advocacy approaches that respect and support human rights

Background to the discussion:
Around the world, we have seen instances of policy reversals on human rights protections and programs, which were critical to creating the enabling environment for business to respect human rights.  In addition to these policy reversals, many governments continue to have restrictive or discriminatory laws in place towards particular groups, such as women or migrants.
As part of the “protect, respect and remedy” framework, the UN Guiding Principles created a global baseline expectation on companies to respect human rights, while also guiding business to use its ‘leverage’ in business relationships to help governments protect these rights. Exercising business leverage is more complex when human rights impacts are not caused by a company or ‘directly linked’ to its operations, products, and services. 
When states are not fulfilling their duty to protect human rights, how can or should business use its leverage to support human rights in policy engagement?
This interactive session will give participants an opportunity to engage in important questions on businesses’ role in public policy engagement to support human rights, deepening social exclusion and rampant inequality.
 
Session Design Principles:
Informative discussion inviting a diversity of perspectives
  1. Participatory and engaging
  2. Provides valuable ideas for potential areas of future collaboration
  3. Provides valuable ideas for potential areas of future collaboration


Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Rajiv Joshi

Rajiv Joshi

Managing Director, The B Team
Rajiv Joshi is a social entrepreneur and activist who serves as Managing Director and a founding member of The B Team, based in New York. He is working actively with some of the world’s most influential CEOs to help redefine the role of business in tackling inequality, corruption... Read More →
avatar for Margaret Jungk

Margaret Jungk

Managing Director, Human Rights, BSR

Speakers
avatar for Jean-Yves Art

Jean-Yves Art

Sr Director, Strategic Partnerships, Microsoft
avatar for Shelly Heald Han

Shelly Heald Han

Director of Civil Society Engagement, Fair Labor Association
Shelly is the director of civil society engagement at the Fair Labor Association, a multi-stakeholder initiative that works to improve labor conditions for workers in global supply chains. Based in Washington, DC, she is an experienced business and human rights advocate who has worked... Read More →
avatar for Paloma Muñoz Quick

Paloma Muñoz Quick

Directora, Investor Alliance for Human Rights
The Investor Alliance for Human Rights provides a platform for investors to engage companies human rights due diligence, as well as governments, multilateral organizations and standard-setting bodies to help create enabling environments for responsible business conduct.


Tuesday November 27, 2018 6:15pm - 7:45pm
Room XXIII

6:15pm

Documentary - Combatting modern slavery in supply chains - Lessons from two sectoral campaigns
Organised by Doughty Street Chambers with Traidcraft and Ethical Trade Initiative

Brief description
The session is intended to discuss the issue of combatting modern slavery in supply chains through the perspective of two sectoral responses and two industries. The session will show two short videos (around 5 mins each) on the Rajasthan Stone Sector and the Assam tea Industry, which are meant to highlight some of the issues and then engender discussion on the question of what could be done to combat modern slavery in supply chains from an industry, NGO and legal perspective.

Session objectives
The objectives for the session are:
  • To highlight some of the violations in two important supply chains which the attendees may not be aware of.
  • To highlight the current campaign on the transparency in the Assam tea supply chain.
  • To highlight the current work that has been done and is planning to be done on the Rajasthan Stone Supply chain.
  • To have a greater understanding of what are the barriers to combatting modern slavery in those supply chains.
  • To have a greater understanding of why companies are finding difficulties in mapping supply chains.
  • To have a greater understanding of what legal avenues may be possible for combatting the most serious human rights violations in supply chains.

Key discussion questions

What are the key lessons from these two sectoral campaigns in:
  • Addressing the main barriers to combatting modern slavery in supply chains?
  • how companies should enhance their due diligence in supply chains?
  • why many companies are not enhancing their due diligence in supply chains?
  • what stakeholders can do to improve due diligence in supply chains?
  • what lawyers can do to improve due diligence in supply chains?

Format of the session
There will be:
  • Short video on Assam Tea Supply chain, followed by a 10 min introduction by Fiona Gooch, on the campaign.
  • Short video on Rajasthan Stone Supply chain, followed by a 10 min introduction by Krishnendu Mukherjee on the issue.
  • Response by Cindy Berman on the issues raised.
  • Further response by Fiona Gooch and Krishnendu Mukherjee
  • Discussion from the floor.

Background to the discussion
A backdrop to the discussion is the reluctance of many large companies in the UK to engage with s.54 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015. By drilling down on lessons from two sectoral case studies, the aim is to generate a discussion rooted in practical examples on how barriers and challenges to progress can be overcome.


Speakers
avatar for Cindy Berman

Cindy Berman

Head of Modern Slavery Strategy, Ethical Trading Initiative
avatar for Fiona Gooch

Fiona Gooch

Senior Policy Adviser, Traidcraft Exchange
Fiona works to improve the impact UK-linked businesses have on vulnerable farmers, workers and communities in developing countries. This includes work on supply chains, company law, competition policy, legal remedies, social reporting, business and human rights and investment. She... Read More →
avatar for Elise Groulx

Elise Groulx

Associate Tenant, Doughty Street Chambers
ELISE GROULX DIGGS, ESQ., Ad.E., LL.M.Associate Tenant Doughty Street ChambersBI for Business Integrity & Partners LLC, PrincipalElise Groulx Diggs advises corporations, governments and international organizations on the human rights and legal issues associated with their investment... Read More →
avatar for Krishnendu Mukherjee

Krishnendu Mukherjee

Barrister and Advocate, Doughty Street Chambers
Krishnendu Mukherjee is a barrister and Indian advocate at Doughty Street Chambers in London. He has extensive experience in trying to remedy human rights violations against corporations, including advice, litigation, negotiation, and OECD complaints. He is part of the Business and... Read More →


Tuesday November 27, 2018 6:15pm - 7:45pm
Room XXI
 
Wednesday, November 28
 

8:30am

Investing in the Human Right to Housing
Organized by OHCHR

Brief description of the session:
This session will discuss what steps investors in residential real estate should take to exercise human rights due diligence, in line with the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, to avoid negative impacts on the right to adequate housing and support the realization of Target 11.1 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (ensuring adequate housing for all by 2030).
The session will continue the conversation started at last year’s Forum on Business and Human Rights amongst diverse stakeholders on the ‘financialization of housing’ and its relationship to the realization of the right to adequate housing. In her 2017 report, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to adequate housing called on States and the private sector to give priority attention to the social function of housing and called for more engagement and dialogue between States, human rights actors, international and domestic financial regulatory bodies, private equity firms and major investors.

Session objectives: 
  • To consider what practical steps investors in residential real estate should take to exercise human rights due diligence, in line with the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, with a focus on measures to avoid negative impacts on the right to adequate housing;
  • To consider how real estate investors by preventing adverse human rights impacts will also contribute to the realization of Target 11.1 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (ensuring adequate housing for all by 2030).
  • To stimulate debate about remedies that could be employed to ensure access to justice, and accountability of financial institutions and private actors for the right to housing.

Key discussion  questions: 
  1. What steps should real estate investors take to exercise human rights due diligence in order to respect the human right to adequate housing?
  2. How can States, private actors, and NGOs and others work together to help ensure that real estate investment does not adversely impact the right to adequate housing?
  3. What steps can be taken by different stakeholders to promote real estate investment practices that will contribute to the commitments to ensuring adequate housing for all by 2030?

Format of the session:
8:30-8:40 Introduction of the issue by moderator
8:40-9:10 Question
9:10-9:40 Scenario
9:40-9:45 Wrap-up

Background to the discussion:
At a time of rapid urbanization worldwide, the financialization of housing has been linked to soaring land and property values and unprecedented displacement of the poor. Capital investment in real estate is deemed a smart investment with assured returns. Investments of pension funds, for example, demanding strong returns are increasingly moving towards real estate investment. So far, adverse impacts of certain investments in real estate and housing on the right to adequate housing have not received sufficient attention.
Recently, a number of States have started to implement policy responses to prevent adverse human rights impacts of the financialization of housing through taxation and incentives. Also there is an increasing recognition of the independent responsibility of investment institutions to exercise human rights due diligence in line with the United Nations Guiding Principles and other relevant frameworks, such as the OECD MNE Guidelines, OECD guidance for institutional investors, and the Principles for Responsible Investment.
Little attention has been given to the role that private investment in housing must play if States are to realize target 11.1 of the SDGs to ensure access to adequate housing by all by 2030, and how the application of human rights norms and standards with respect to effective remedies in this sphere could alter the role of private investment – from one which undermines the right to housing to one which facilitates its realization.


Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
NF

Natacha Foucard

Chief, Sustainable Development Section, OHCHR

Speakers
avatar for Manuel Aalbers

Manuel Aalbers

Professor of Human Geography, KU Leuven, the University of Leuven
Manuel B. Aalbers is full professor of Human Geography at KU Leuven/University of Leuven (Belgium) where he leads a research group on the intersection of real estate, finance and states, spearheaded by a grant from the European Research Council. He has also published on financialization... Read More →
JD

Jory David Cohen

Director of Investment and Finance, Inspirit Foundation
LF

Leilani Farha

Special Rapporteur on the right to adequate housing
KS

Kevin Stein

Deputy Director, California Renvistment Coalition


Wednesday November 28, 2018 8:30am - 9:45am
Room XXIV

10:00am

Engaging and safeguarding workers across value chains: identifying good practice approaches
Interpretation is provided in English, French, Spanish and Korean.


Organized by Ethical Trading Initiative

Brief description
This session would facilitate multi-stakeholder dialogue and lesson-sharing on how to engage with vulnerable workers engaging in precarious work in international supply chains, and how to integrate them into corporate human rights due diligence approaches.
Insights will be provided by:
  • a leading international trade union representative working to support exploited workers and victims of trafficking;
  • a leading multinational company representative who will speak about engaging with migrant workers in the Italian tomato sector;
  • a leading researcher and lawyer specialising in business and human rights; and
  • a multi-stakeholder initiative representative working with companies, trade unions and civil society organisations on mitigating risks in complex international supply chains.

Session objectives
  • Insights into specific approaches to engaging vulnerable workers, adopted by companies, unions, CSOs and researchers.
  • A focus on engaging with vulnerable workers who face specific types of challenges such as payment of recruitment fees and lack of representation.
  • An improved understanding of different techniques of safeguarding; working to ensure that people seeking to enforce their rights (and also their representatives and whistleblowers) are protected from threats of intimidation, harassment and reprisals.

Key discussion questions
  • How should companies work to integrate the rights and needs of vulnerable workers through direct engagment whilst ensuring safeguarding?
  • How can businesses mitigate the rise of vulnerable employment in international supply chains through Human rights due diligence?

Format of the session
  • Audience participants to pose brief questions to speakers at the outset to frame later discussion.
  • Reflections from speakers on their approaches to engagement and safeguarding.
  • Interactive engagement with audience on recommended approaches and identfying blockages to effective HRDD with workers in global value chains.

Background to the discussion
Worldwide, around 1.4 billion workers, most of them women, are in insecure jobs or in the informal sector. Supply chains continue to be one of the most important levers for business to create positive impact in the world, with an estimated 80% of global trade passing through them annually. However, in too many places, workers are denied basic human rights, and migrant workers continue to be exploited.

In the drive to bring ever more products to market, people are often seen merely as a commodity, with wages pushed down to cut costs. A lack of formal, independent worker representation fuels and exacerbates the problem. If workers do not have access to workplace rights and protections within supplier companies, nothing changes.

Companies that commit to genuine and effective human rights due diligence processes can both mitigate risks to worker’s rights, but also significantly improve the lives of workers by providing decent work.

Engagement with workers is an essential part of corporate human rights due diligence. Social dialogue is about establishing formal or informal processes that enable workers and employers to negotiate or consult collectively on issues concerning their rights and responsibilities and to resolve conflicts peacefully and effectively.

A growing number of examples show that effective social dialogue between workers on the ‘shop floor’ and managers can contribute to decent work, quality jobs, greater equality and inclusive growth – all of which benefit workers and companies alike.

This session will explore how businesses, trade unions and other organisations are engaging with vulnerable workers in Italy, Spain, Southern Africa and elsewhere, and how they go about attempting to ensure that people seeking to enforce their rights are protected from threats of intimidation or reprisals.

Speakers
avatar for Edwin Atema

Edwin Atema

Research and enforcement, FNV - Stichting VNB
avatar for Cindy Berman

Cindy Berman

Head of Modern Slavery Strategy, Ethical Trading Initiative
avatar for David Mcdiarmid

David Mcdiarmid

Corporate Relations Director, Princes Limited
Ethical supply chains in the food industry.Environmental sustainabilityCommunications
avatar for Pia Navazo

Pia Navazo

Researcher, BHR
Human rights impacts un the context of economic operations and global supply chains


Wednesday November 28, 2018 10:00am - 11:20am
Room XXIII

10:00am

What do “Protect, Respect, Remedy” mean in practice in conflict contexts
Interpretation is provided into English , French and Spanish

This Forum session led by the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights will address new ways to strengthen corporate respect for human rights in conflict and post-conflict contexts. It is part of the consultation process for a Working Group project that will lead to recommendations to governments and business enterprises in a report to the UN Human Rights Council in 2020.

The project will address implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in all stages of conflict, from prevention to post-conflict, including transitional justice. It will cover all three pillars of the Guiding Principles:
- the State duty to protect against business-related human rights abuse
- the corporate responsibility to respect human rights
- the need for access to remedy for victims of business-related human rights abuse



Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Gerald Pachoud

Gerald Pachoud

Managing partner, Pluto & Associates
Gerald Pachoud is advising the UN Working Group's project on business and human rights in conflict and post-conflict contexts.Gerald is a global public policy expert with significant experience of the landscape and the trends in business and society that affect the corporate responsibility... Read More →
avatar for Anita Ramasastry

Anita Ramasastry

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Ms. Anita Ramasastry is the Roland L. Hjorth Professor of Law and the Director of the Graduate Program in Sustainable International Development at the University of Washington School Of Law. She researches and teaches in the fields of law and development, anti-corruption, international... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for John Katsos

John Katsos

Law and Ethics Scholar, American University of Sharjah School of Business Administration
Business in conflict contexts. Advancing peace through human rights promotion.
avatar for Maria Prandi

Maria Prandi

Coordinator, Network on Business, Conflict and Human Rights
The BCHR Network brings together researchers, practitioners and NGO representatives from various fields with the aim of researching and analysing the role of business in conflict situations as well as the violations of human and peoples’ rights and other social and environmental... Read More →
avatar for Jamie Williamson

Jamie Williamson

Executive Director, ICOCA


Wednesday November 28, 2018 10:00am - 11:20am
Room XXI

10:00am

Trends and challenges in promoting business respect for human rights in Asia
Interpretation is provided in English and Chinese.

Session led by UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights and UNDP

This Forum session is part of the Forum track on trends and challenges in promoting business respect for human rights in different regions of the world.
The aim is to facilitate peer learning and multi-stakeholder dialogue around lessons learned. Innovative ideas shall be showcased with a view to scale up emerging good practices and reinforce a race to the top among governments and businesses in the Asia region.

This interactive session will be divided in two parts:
After a brief scene setting from civil society and business representatives, Part I will present key examples of how Governments in the Region are promoting business respect for Human Rights. Representatives of the Governments of Thailand, India, Indonesia, Vietnam among others, will illustrate how they are setting expectations for companies to carry out human rights due diligence (HRDD), changing corporate laws to promote responsible business conduct, creating incentives through public procurement, and taking steps to ensure a bouquet of remedies is available to victims.
In Part II, several inspiring ideas on how to turn HRDD from paper to practice will be presented in TED-Style snapshot sessions. After interaction with the participants, mobile technology will be used to survey the opinion of those present. This will involve solutions considered most innovative, most impactful and worth replicating in other contexts. Initiatives most inspiring and innovative will be given additional dedicated space to illustrate their impact in the two Regional Forums on Business and Human Rights (for South Asia and Southeast Asia) planned for the first half of 2019.  

Program
  • Opening/setting the scene (30 mins)
  • Part I: Fostering Government Leadership to Set Expectations for Companies to Respect Human Rights (60 mins)
  • Break (15 mins)
  • Part II:  Pitch Deck: Innovative and Inspiring Solutions to take the UNGPs from Paper to Practice: Snapshot sessions (5 minutes each) followed by Qs and As (80 minutes) through mobile technology to survey their opinion on the innovative value, replicability and scalability of the initiatives 
    • Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact: FPIC Policies into action
    • Caux RT/ANA: Technology to monitor supply chains, Japan  
    • UN Global Compact Network Indonesia: HRDD in the Agri-Food Business Sector
    • Terre des Hommes: Multi stakeholder partnerships to end child labour
    • China Labor Watch: Access to Remedy for workers, China
    • Earth Rights International: NGOs and NHRIs monitoring HR abuses by outbound investments, SEA
    • University of Sussex: National employment injury insurance (EII) schemes in Bangladesh and Pakistan
    • FORUM ASIA: Good practices and possible collective actions to counter legal harassment of Human Rights Defenders

Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Harpreet Kaur

Harpreet Kaur

UNDP - Asia Pacific
Harpreet Kaur is a Business and Human Rights Specialist at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Bangkok Regional Hub. Prior to this Harpreet lead the Genpact Centre for Women’s Leadership at Ashoka University in India, where she steered the agenda on ‘Women, Workplace... Read More →
avatar for Sean Lees

Sean Lees

Business and Human Rights Specialist, UNDP
Sean Lees is a Business and Human Rights Specialist at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Bangkok Regional Hub. Prior to his work at UNDP, Sean worked on Asia-Pacific trade and investment policy at the Pacific Basin Economic Council and the East-West Center (1994-1996... Read More →
avatar for Livio Sarandrea

Livio Sarandrea

Programme Specialist On Rule Of Law, UNDP
Livio Sarandrea, is the Chief Adviser and Manager of UNDP’s project: “Business and Human Rights in Asia promoting Responsible Business practices through regional partnerships (B+HR Asia)” which is operational in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Surya Deva

Surya Deva

Chairperson, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Mr. Surya Deva is an Associate Professor at the School of Law of City University of Hong Kong. He holds BA (Hons), LLB and LLM from the University of Delhi and a PhD from Sydney Law School, and has taught previously at the University of Delhi and at the National Law Institute University... Read More →
avatar for Binota Dhamai

Binota Dhamai

Executive Member, Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact
JH

Jiang Hui

Vice-President, China Chamber of Commerce of Metal, Minerals and Chemicals
avatar for Hiroshi Ishida

Hiroshi Ishida

Executive Director, Caux Round Table Japan
Hiroshi Ishida is the Executive Director of the Caux Round Table Japan (CRT Japan).He taught at the Institute of Business and Accounting, Kwansei Gakuin University between 2005 and March 2014, where he served as promoted to Professor on April 2013. He also taught at Aoyama Gakuin... Read More →
avatar for Y.W. Junardy

Y.W. Junardy

President, Global Compact Network Indonesia
Y.W. Junardy is the Deputy President Commissioner of PT Rajawali Corpora, an Indonesian national holding investment Company operating in diverse industries i.e. hotel & property, land and air transportation, plantation, mining, infrastructure and IT Services.Prior to his current position... Read More →
avatar for Elaine Lu

Elaine Lu

Program Officer, China Labor Watch
avatar for Chao MA

Chao MA

Deputy Division Chief, China Enterprise Confederation
Ma ChaoDeputy Section Chief, Employers Department, China Enterprise ConfederationFor 15 years, he is involving and responsible for international cooperation projects with ILO, IOE, UNAIDS, UNDP, UNGC, National Employers Organizations such as NHO(Norway), VCCI(Vietnam),APINDO(Indonesia... Read More →
avatar for Bobbie Sta Maria

Bobbie Sta Maria

Director for Labour Rights and Asia, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre
avatar for Thanh Tu Nguyen

Thanh Tu Nguyen

Director General, Ministry of Justice, Government of Vietnam
Mr. Tu Thanh Nguyen (Nguyễn Thanh Tú) is Director General of the Department of Civil and Economic Laws, Ministry of Justice of Vietnam. He holds the degrees of: Doctor of Laws (Lund University, Sweden), Licentiate of Laws (Lund University, Sweden), Master of Laws (Lund University... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Prentice

Rebecca Prentice

Senior Lecturer in Anthropology, University of Sussex
Rebecca Prentice is a Senior Lecturer in Anthropology and International Development at the University of Sussex in Brighton, UK. She is author of the report, Workers’ Right to Compensation after Garment Factory Disasters: Making Rights a Reality (2018), and co-editor, with Geert... Read More →
avatar for Benny Agus Prima

Benny Agus Prima

Human Rights Defenders Programme Officer, Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA)
Benny has been working at human rights defenders programme of FORUM-ASIA since 2016. He holds LLM degree in public international law from the University of Nottingham, UK. Prior to joining human rights defenders programme of FORUM-ASIA, he was working on ASEAN human rights advocacy... Read More →
SP

Somn Promaros

Director-General of the Rights and Liberties Protection Department, Ministry of Justice, Thailand
avatar for Natthakanya Saengpho

Natthakanya Saengpho

National Human Rights Commission of Thailand
WS

Wora Suk

Earth Rights International
avatar for Vidya Tikoo

Vidya Tikoo

Senior Vice President, Sustainability, Aditya Birla Management Corporation Pvt. Ltd.
A sustainable business expert, can work out strategies for businesses and conglomerates. Have worked in the areas of environment, transportation, human rights, occupational health, safety, supply chain linked with sustainability of businesses
avatar for Tirza Voss

Tirza Voss

Technical Adviser - Private Sector, Terre des Hommes
AW

Andika Wahab

Fellow IKMAS
PM

Prabianto Mukti Wibowo

Deputy Assistant Minister for Forestry, Ministry of Economic Affairs, Ministry of Economic Affairs, Indonesia


Wednesday November 28, 2018 10:00am - 1:00pm
Room XVII

11:40am

Community engagement for HRIAs in challenging contexts: a round table discussion
Interpretation is provided in English, French and Spanish.

Organized by NomoGaia, BSR and the Danish Institute for Human Rights

Brief description of the session:
Community engagement in HRIA focuses on 'rightsholders' - the individuals whose human rights are likely to be affected by an operation. Identifying and engaging with rightsholders requires trust building in all contexts. However, trust is harder to obtain and the costs of failure are steeper with particularly vulnerable populations.
 
This session considers good practice in rightsholder engagement in sensitive contexts, building on the experiences of affected rightsholders to both validate and challenge the practices of even leading companies. A rightsholder, scholar, practitioner and company viewpoint will be probed during the round-table session.

Session objectives:
  • Draw out consensus on what constitutes good practice in rightsholder engagement
  • Delve into the barriers for best practice resulting from community distrust, ongoing state repression, lack of corporate expertise/leverage, social marginalization, etc

Key discussion questions:

What should corporate actors to do differently to ensure their community engagement is meaningful with vulnerable rightsholder groups in challenging contexts?
What can they do if the initial approach is not successful?

Format of the session:
This roundtable discussion will start with brief descriptions of rightsholder engagement processes at HRIAs for companies ENI and Diageo. Then the practitioners supporting those HRIAs will describe challenges and successes in rightsholder engagement, followed by analytical questioning from the researcher/scholar perspective. A roundtable discussion session will follow, before an audience-driven Q&A is integrated.

Background to the discussion
This discussion draws on the unique experiences of  rightholders as well as speakers who have either engaged directly with affected rightsholders in fragile contexts or who have conducted thorough scholarship on meaningful HRDD. It aims to tackle complex questions of how to connect with rightsholders who are reluctant to be critical or express personal opinions, fearing state (or other) retribution. It challenges the assumption that rightsholders are eager to engage with companies or are prepared to discuss the effects of corporate activities on their lives, and it examines ways to overcome such barriers. It considers the possibility that companies might initially struggle to meaningfully engage rightsholders but can create long-term approaches to build trust.


Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Kendyl Salcito

Kendyl Salcito

Executive Director, NomoGaia

Speakers
avatar for Tulika Bansal

Tulika Bansal

Senior Adviser, Danish Institute for Human Rights
Tulika has 8+ years of experience working as adviser at the Danish Institute for Human Rights advising various multinational companies globally in implementing the UNGPs. Her expertise lies in corporate human rights due diligence and developing & conducting human rights impact assessments... Read More →
avatar for Salah Husseini

Salah Husseini

Manager, BSR
Salah leads BSR’s consulting and collaboration efforts on human rights for companies in New York, including the cross-industry Human Rights Working Group. He supports companies through various human rights projects and has expertise in consumer products, food and agriculture, manufacturing... Read More →
JT

Jethro Tulin

Executive Director, Porgera Alliance
avatar for Pasquale Vetta

Pasquale Vetta

Manager – Human Rights, Transparency and Global issues, Eni SpA


Wednesday November 28, 2018 11:40am - 1:00pm
Room XXIII

1:00pm

Understanding Business Impact on Children—Presenting the Children’s Rights and Business Atlas
Session organized by Unicef

Short description of the session:
Every business leaves a footprint on children — as family members of workers, employees, consumers, and community members affected by operations and supply chains. The Children’s Rights and Business Atlas is an online tool designed to help business, government and industry stakeholders better understand their footprint, and how inter-related issues including wages, work hours, products, environmental impact, security, and online protection policies, impact children. An online interactive and data-driven platform, the Atlas makes use of publicly available country data to provide a quantitative assessment of children’s rights across 195 countries and territories, and degree to which children’s rights are respected, across the globe in the Workplace, at the Marketplace, and within the Community and Environment.
 
Session Objectives:
The objective of the session is to inform business how it can make use of the Workplace, Marketplace and Community and Environment Indices, country narratives and industry insights provided by the Atlas, to lessen the negative child impact through improved due diligence risk and impact assessment processes based on evidence.
 
Key discussion questions:
  • Why is children's rights due diligence especially critical for the achievement of the SDGs? 
  • How can the Atlas help businesses to approach comprehensive due diligence? 

Background to the Discussion: 
Children everywhere have rights. These include: the right of every child to provision of a standard of living adequate for health and well-being; the right of every child to protection from neglect, abuse, exploitation and harmful substances; and the right of every child to full participation in family, cultural and social life. Addressing adverse children’s rights impacts requires the taking of adequate measures for prevention, mitigation and, where appropriate, remediation.
Business impacts children daily well beyond child labour. The employment of their family and the broader environmental and community conditions where business operates affect children’s ability to grow, develop and learn. The nature of the work done by children and their family can determine, for example, how women breastfeed, how men and women parent, and how adolescents successfully transition from school to work.
Respect for children’s rights is a shared responsibility. Children represent one third of the world’s underlying population but disproportionately account for half of the world’s poor, highlighting their vulnerability and the necessity of prioritizing children in the fight to eliminate poverty. Business can contribute to sustainable development for all in support of the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals by taking a child-centred approach to policy and practice.


Refreshments will be served after the session

Speakers
avatar for Shanelle Hall

Shanelle Hall

Deputy Executive Director, Field Results, UNICEF
Shanelle Hall was appointed by the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon as Deputy Executive Director of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) on 6 June, 2016. In addition to her role as part of the executive leadership team of UNICEF, she oversees two of UNICEF’s... Read More →
avatar for Alinde Melin

Alinde Melin

Global Children’s Rights Manager, Inter IKEA Group
PG

Paula Guillet de Monthoux

Vice Chairman of the Board, Global Child Forum
avatar for Donna Westerman

Donna Westerman

VP, ESG Global Risk and Head of Consumer Retail, Verisk Maplecroft
Building on a 25+ year career in the CPG Procurement, Supply Chain and Responsible Sourcing areas my focus is on establishing and optimizing global supply chain policies, processes and performance measurements. In my current role as VP of E.S.G. and Head of Retail and Consumer Goods... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Room XI

3:00pm

Widening uptake of the UNGPs: a spotlight on SMEs
Interpretation is provided in English, French and Spanish.

Organized by the International Organisation of Employers 

Brief description
This session will focus on how the responsibility to respect human rights applies to SMEs and what can be done to strengthen their engagement on human rights. The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) acknowledge that the means through which a company meets its responsibility to respect human rights "will be proportional to, among other factors, its size," adding that SMEs "may have less capacity, as well as more informal processes and management structures than larger companies, so their respective policies and processes will take on different forms."
To date, most awareness-raising, capacity building and policy-related efforts have focused on the world's largest brands and retailers, with SMEs often an afterthought in discussions and initiatives on responsible business conduct and business and human rights. Yet, SMEs form the backbone of national economies and the global supply chains of large companies. They account for about 90% of all businesses (according to the International Finance Corporation) and they contribute up to 45% of total employment (according to the World Bank). Their collective contribution to society and the planet is huge.

Session objectives
  • To explore the different challenges and conditions facing SMEs and how awareness-raising and capacity-building efforts and policy measures can be better tailored to support SMEs to respect human rights in line with their respective size, capacity, resources, and impact on human rights.
  • To draw attention onto the world's largest category of companies, and away from the usual focus on global brands and retailers – ie: how can we widen implementation of the UNGPs?
Key discussion questions
  1. How does respect for human rights, including the human rights due diligence process, apply to SMEs?
  2. How do SMEs currently act in a responsible manner and what lessons can be drawn from this?
  3. What are the drivers for SMEs to implement the UNGPs? How can more SMEs be encouraged to respect human rights in situations where the drivers are less applicable?
  4. What opportunities and challenges face SMEs in respecting human rights?
  5. How do policy measures currently impact on SMEs? What policy responses are needed based on these lessons?
  6. What practical support can be provided to assist SMEs?

Background to the discussion
Useful links


Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
Speakers
MB

Mustain Billah

Component Coordinator, Export Competitiveness for Jobs
Mustain Billah is a Dhaka based social innovation and civic engagement thought leader. A blogger and opinion maker; an ardent advocate of human rights, pluralism, sustainability and circular economy. He is keenly interested about skills education, systems thinking and real-world solutions... Read More →
avatar for Cecilia Flores

Cecilia Flores

President, WomenCeo Peru
Corporate Lawyer and a person committed with gender equility


Wednesday November 28, 2018 3:00pm - 4:45pm
Room XVII

5:00pm

Plenary III: Summing up and looking ahead

http://webtv.un.org/meetings-events/human-rights-council/forum-on-business-and-human-rights/watch/plenary-iii-forum-on-business-and-human-rights-2018/5972698700001

Description
The Forum will conclude with statements by key stakeholder constituencies to:
  • Highlight key messages from Forum discussions on how to advance corporate respect for human rights and make human rights due diligence part of standard business practice.
  • Reiterate the most critical gaps and challenges as well as the most promising innovations, emerging practices and collective action efforts.
  • Hear calls for action from diverse stakeholders on the need for speeding and scaling up implementation of all three pillars of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (“Protect, Respect and Remedy”).
The UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights that guides and chairs the Forum will wrap up the event by sharing their reflections on key takeaways and implications for the way forward for all stakeholders, including by taking stock of progress toward their “2020 roadmap” presented at the closing of the 2017 Forum.

Key references

Moderator/ Introductory Remark...
avatar for Dante Pesce

Dante Pesce

Chairperson, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Mr. Dante Pesce holds a Masters in Political Science from the Catholic University of Chile and a Masters in Public Administration from Harvard University. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the VINCULAR Center for Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development at the... Read More →

Speakers
MC

Maria Cristina Figueroa Bouriyu

Co-chair, Indigenous Caucus
Under her leadership, the association Alaulayu Apushi, saw the formal socialization of thecommunities of the south of La Guajira corresponding to 12 reserves (‘resguardos’), 16 indigenoussettlements of the municipalities of Hatonuevo, Barrancas, and the dialogue with indigenousauthorities... Read More →
avatar for Sharan Burrow

Sharan Burrow

General Secretary, International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)
Sharan Burrow was re-elected for a third term as General Secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) at its World Congress in December  2018.  A passionate advocate and campaigner for social justice, women’s rights, the environment and labour law reforms... Read More →
avatar for Danilo Chammas

Danilo Chammas

Lawyer, Justiça nos Trilhos
Danilo Chammas is a lawyer and human rights defender who lives in Maranhão, a state of dense Amazon rainforest in northeastern Brazil. He coordinates the legal team of Justiça nos Trilhos (Justice on the Rails), which works to defend the human rights of those impacted by mining... Read More →
avatar for Surya Deva

Surya Deva

Chairperson, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Mr. Surya Deva is an Associate Professor at the School of Law of City University of Hong Kong. He holds BA (Hons), LLB and LLM from the University of Delhi and a PhD from Sydney Law School, and has taught previously at the University of Delhi and at the National Law Institute University... Read More →
avatar for Elżbieta Karska

Elżbieta Karska

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Ms. Elżbieta Karska is a Professor and the Head of the Department of Protection of Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law and the Director of the Institute of International Law, European Union and International Relations at the Faculty of Law and Administration, Cardinal... Read More →
avatar for Mthunzi Mdwaba

Mthunzi Mdwaba

CEO, TZoro IBC
Mthunzi Perry-Mason Mdwaba is an entrepreneur, businessman, executive and passionate advocate for business in all its diverse forms and across developing and developed nations. He is a fierce defender of skills development, the conditions required for sustainable enter-prises and... Read More →
avatar for Githu Muigai

Githu Muigai

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Mr. Githu Muigai is current Associate Professor of Law, Department of Public Law, University of Nairobi; Chairman at the Council of Legal Education in Kenya; and Senior Partner, Mohammed & Muigai Advocates. He previously served as a Commissioner with the former Constitution of Kenya... Read More →
avatar for Anita Ramasastry

Anita Ramasastry

Member, UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights
Ms. Anita Ramasastry is the Roland L. Hjorth Professor of Law and the Director of the Graduate Program in Sustainable International Development at the University of Washington School Of Law. She researches and teaches in the fields of law and development, anti-corruption, international... Read More →


Wednesday November 28, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Room XX