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Business action [clear filter]
Tuesday, November 27
 

8:15am

Snapshot: Exiting responsibly - Respect for human rights in circumstances of urgent exit

Brief description of the session:
Human rights due diligence is an ongoing process that requires companies to maintain a “true picture” of its human rights risks over time. In particular, commentary to UN GP 18 notes that human rights impact assessments should be undertaken at regular intervals and specifically prior to “major decisions or changes in the operation”. While not explicitly mentioned in the commentary, one of the major decision a business can take is that of leaving a market and reducing or winding up operations. While this decision can be taken for purely commercial reasons, it can also be conditioned by changing political, economic or physical circumstances such as the eruption or intensification of war, the occurrence of natural disasters, the instatement of economic sanctions or even health crises. These events might impact the capacity of the company to identify, avoid and manage human rights risks and present renewed challenges for the company to fulfil its responsibility to respect human rights. How can companies wind down or exit operations responsibly under such circumstances?

Session objectives:
While the business and human rights debate has been focused on key corporate decisions such as market entry, new investments or the launching of new products or services, less attention has been given to questions of sales and market exit – especially in circumstances of urgent exit. The purpose of the snapshot session will be to raise awareness of this issue and spur interest in exploring the implications of the UNGPs.


Speakers
AS

Andrea Saldarriaga

Visiting Fellow (LSE) and Co-director IBR, London School of Economics and Political Science and the Iran Business Responsibility Project (IBR)


Tuesday November 27, 2018 8:15am - 8:30am
Room XXIV

8:30am

Snapshot: New insights. Projects from BHR Young researchers (I)

Brief description of the presentation: 
This snapshot sessions will be based on a forthcoming report compiled by four participants of our 2018 BHR Young Researchers Summit, titled Good Business: The Economic Case for Promoting Human Rights. The objective of this report is to offer a more nuanced, evidence-based assessment of the ‘business case’ for human rights. More specifically, the session engages with two clusters of arguments: The first cluster looks at the costs and benefits associated with embracing or ignoring human rights in the workplace and in community relations. It provides insight, for example, in the relation between employee loyalty and human rights respect, or the cost of conflict resolution measures in case of worsening community relations. The second cluster demonstrates how governments are increasingly using economic leverage as a tool to promote corporate respect for human rights. The utilization of human rights standards in public procurement contracts or in the provision of export credits will be among the examples of how countries implementing the UNGPs have started to create economic incentives for businesses to respect human rights.

Presentation objectives:
The session will present the arguments underscoring the growing evidence that respecting human rights is not only a moral imperative for business, but is increasingly turning into an economic necessity.


Speakers
avatar for Basak Baglayan

Basak Baglayan

Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Luxembourg
avatar for Marisa McVey

Marisa McVey

PhD Candidate, University of St. Andrews
I'm a second year PhD Researcher at the University of St Andrews in Scotland. My research focuses on the UNGPs, corporate accountability and communities.


Tuesday November 27, 2018 8:30am - 8:45am
Room XXIV

8:45am

Snapshot: New insights. Projects from BHR Young researchers (II)

Brief description of the presentation:
This snapshot sessions will be based on a forthcoming report compiled by four participants of our 2018 BHR Young Researchers Summit, titled Good Business: The Economic Case for Promoting Human Rights. The objective of this report is to offer a more nuanced, evidence-based assessment of the ‘business case’ for human rights. More specifically, the session engages with two clusters of arguments: The first cluster analyzes the costs and benefits associated with corporate abuse-related lawsuits, such as information-disclosure cost or reputational damage and it shows the effects of lawsuits on the share price of companies. The second cluster assesses the complex role of consumers and investors in driving responsible business behaviour as well as of new legislation that increases not least the demands of businesses towards each other.

Presentation objectives:
The session will discuss the arguments underscoring the growing evidence that respecting human rights is not only a moral imperative for business, but is increasingly turning into an economic necessity.



Speakers
avatar for Ingrid Landau

Ingrid Landau

Lecturer, Monash Business School, Monash University
avatar for Kebene Wodajo

Kebene Wodajo

PhD Candidate, Shanghai Jiao Tong University


Tuesday November 27, 2018 8:45am - 9:00am
Room XXIV